Browsed by
Tag: writing

Painless Vim, Part One, Almost Done!

Painless Vim, Part One, Almost Done!

Part One is really coming along!

Sure, Part One is nine chapters long and Part Two is currently slated to be around seventeen chapters, but hey, progress is progress. 

I’m having a lot of fun writing Painless Git, and I think that even if Part Two is longer, it’ll be even more fun, both to write and to read. 

Will Write for Money

Will Write for Money

You may have noticed a new button over there on the right. Looks like a mug with a heart on it. Looks kinda like this:

Yeah, that’s the one. what’s that lil’ guy doing there?

Here’s the thing: back in the day I ran ads on my blogs. They never brought in all that much money, usually just enough to keep the lights on. But I never liked it. I’m not some fancy auteur who thinks I’m “too good” for advertising; I just don’t like feel of ads, they’re a distraction from the content.

So here’s my new solution: a tip jar. If you like this site, and you have a few bucks to spare, I’d love it if you drop me a tip.

ko-fi is great because every cent you drop in there goes directly to me. no middle men. I like that! 😆 Right now I’m playing with “ko-fi Gold” which costs me $6/month, but if three people every month chip in I’m still in good shape.

And Here’s What You Get

But this isn’t just a one-way street. When you drop me a tip in ko-fi you can make a little comment along with that tip. Why not make it an idea for a story or an essay? If it’s family friendly I’ll write it up and post it to ko-fi as a (timed) subscriber-only post.

Beyond being family friendly I really don’t have any limits. If you want me to write about you waking up as a bear in a new version of the Metamorphosis I’m game. If you like one of my stories or series and want more of that you can just yell “MOAR ANGEL LIZ” in the comments and I’ll get the hint. And you’ll have access to an Angel Liz story that won’t be on the site for at least 30 days.

Like I said, this is an experiment. Running these blogs isn’t exactly breaking the bank, but it’s not free either. I can’t wait to see what kind of weird stuff you wonderful people want me to write.

Automation for Authors

Automation for Authors

Or: Writing with Python

I really love Scrivener. I may have mentioned this before. And I really love Leanpub. And for the most part, they work really well together. But there’s always room for improvement. And tonight I have added yet another layer of sophistication to my workflow. I’m pretty excited to share this with you.

The Workflow

Here’s a high level overview of how this all works:

  1. Write in Scrivener
  2. Export text files from Scrivener
  3. Check text files into a git repository shared with Leanpub
  4. Tell Leanpub to publish the book

Scrivener: Writing and Exporting

In Scrivener, you write all your text in little individual sections that you can move around at will. This is incredibly handy. If you decide the chapter on configurations should be in Part I: Beginning instead of Part II: Refinement you just drag it to the appropriate folder and you’re good to go. You can then export all these snippets as text files, and Scrivener will keep your file structure intact, like so:

A list of topics in Scrivener

Which turns into this on export:

The exported files from Scrivener

But where did those numbers in the file names come from? They came from here:

Scrivener Export Options

So now we’ve got a directory full of directories full of text! Let’s send it to Leanpub, right? Well, we need to do a little work first.

Prep for Print: The Leanpub Stuff

If you just give the Leanpub book generator a pile of text files it doesn’t know what order they should be in. So you provide it an extra file, book.txt, that includes all of your text files and the order in which they should be put into the book. The current book.txt file for Painless Git looks like this:

1 Front Matter/1 frontmatter.txt
1 Front Matter/2 Book Status.txt
1 Front Matter/3 Preface.txt
1 Front Matter/4 Introduction.txt
1 Front Matter/5 Structure.txt
2 Main Matter/1 mainmatter.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/01 Part 1.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/02 A Brief History of Git.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/03 Installing.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/04 First Steps.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/05 Commit.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/06 Interlude Tools.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/07 Branching.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/08 Configure.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/09 Sharing.txt
2 Main Matter/2 Beginning/10 Oops.txt
2 Main Matter/3 Refinement/01 Part 2.txt
2 Main Matter/3 Refinement/02 Good Git Habits.txt
2 Main Matter/3 Refinement/03 Small Commits.txt
2 Main Matter/3 Refinement/04 Hygiene.txt
...

When I wrote Painless Vim and Painless Tmux I kept this book.txt file up to date by hand. It was just another text file in Scrivener. So when I added a new section to the book I would go into book.txt and add each new section. The benefit to doing it that was was that I could work on a new section for a while before it got added to the book. The downside, of course, is human error. Sometimes I would add a new file in the wrong place, so chapter two came before chapter one. Or I would update the order in Scrivener and not update it in book.txt, which meant that when I published a new version it didn’t include my new chapter, and I had to fix book.txt, then publish again immediately. Whatever the case, sometimes book.txt got out of sync with reality.

It’s so easy to get files lined up in Scrivener and once you’ve done it in Scriv you shouldn’t have to do it again in book.txt. If you’re a developer the words “write a script” are already foremost in your mind, aren’t they? What if we could hook into git’s workflow to generate book.txt just before we commit?

Oh right, we can.

Python and Git Hooks

So now you need to create book.txt programmatically from your actual file structure. You’ve got numbered everything, so you can just recurse through the directory, find each leaf node and then prepend its path, and you’ve got a file path, right?

You just did too much work. Python is made to make things easy. os.walk will find every file in your directory and all subdirectories. I wrote a short python script that finds all the files, puts them in order, and then calls git add book.txt. Make that executable and save it as /painless_git/.git/hooks/pre-commit and you’re in business, my friend.

So now I no longer have to manage book.txt by hand. Using the features in Scrivener and in git, I’ve made it that much more painless to write Painless Git.

I’ve also come up with a good excuse for why I haven’t added any actual text to Painless Git today.

Introducing Painless Git

Introducing Painless Git

I have a three week break between summer and fall terms in my MBA program, so naturally I decided to write a new Painless book. I’m excited to announce Painless Git, the third [1] book in the Painless series.

The most common request I have received is for a book on something people actually use. And I’m well positioned to write this one. Unlike Painless Vim, which I wrote to help me learn vim, or Painless Tmux, which I wrote to help me learn Tmux, I’m actually already pretty good with git.

At my last job I helped move the entire 600+ developers in our organization from subversion to git, and spent months training individual teams on the new system. Then I switched jobs and moved our team here from subversion to git, and trained them on it. In my time as the “git guy” I’ve seen just about every git mess people can cause and found my way back out of most of them.

So Why Are you Writing This Book Now?

For years I’ve resisted writing Painless Git. I kept coming up with excuses like “I want to write novels!” Or “My wife just had another baby!” Or “I’m getting an MBA and it’s really hard!”

But then a wonderful thing happened: I have been put in charge of a brand new team of developers and guess what? It’s time to teach them git. Faced with this prospect I thought “I could dig up all my old presentations and cheat sheets and teach this team git over the course of a few weeks, or I could spend the next year or so finally writing Painless Git. As I’ve already demonstrated, it doesn’t take much to push me over the edge.

I’m very exited to share this one. Painless Git is a distillation of the tips, tricks, methods, and patterns that I’ve been teaching to teams from one part of Salt Lake City all the way to a suburb twenty miles outside of Salt Lake City. These are patterns and recommendations that have been battle hardened and stood up to old SVN pros and brand new interns alike.


  1. and final. I mean it this time!  ↩
National Novel Writing Month

National Novel Writing Month

Note: This was originally published on the now sadly extinct blog “Favorite Thing EVER!” In 2010. I might re-post a few of my other FtE! writings in the future.

National Novel Writing Month has a simple premise. You write 50,000 words of fiction in November. Got that? Okay, good. Go to it.

You might have some questions. Something like this:
Q: I’m not an author!
A: You are now. Write.
Q: I’ve never figured out sentence structure!
A: Not important. You can edit later. Write.
Q: Why? What do I get out of it? Is there a prize?
A: You’ll figure that out when you get to the end. Write.
Q: What I write will probably be terrible!
A: I’m sure it will. Write.
Q: So…I should just write?
A: Right.

This is real, pedal-to-the-metal time. You’ve been saying for years now that you’ve got a great novel inside of you. You’ve plotted scenes, maybe you’ve even written a few character sketches. But you’ve never actually sat down and pounded through a real draft, from beginning to end.

Now’s your chance, and you’re in good company. Every year tens of thousands of authors sign up, in essence promising that they will do what it takes to get to 50,000 words by December 1st. The forums on the NaNoWriMo official site are a great place to talk with people who are just as–or, if you could use some Schadenfreude, much more–stuck than you. The tone on these forums is usually friendly and helpful, if a bit terse; because everyone’s got a novel they need to get back to.

You’ve also got some good tools. Scrivener (have I mentioned Scrivener before?) is free for the month of November, perfect for NaNoWriMo, and will give you 50% off the price of a permanent license if you meet your 50,000 word quota.

There’s no pressure, no external warnings, no coach urging you to make it to the next goalpost. Just your own personal drive. The site simply provides a place for you to record your progress and shows you where you should be if you’re keeping up a nice, even pace. In reality, there’s nothing stopping you from just walking away. But you’ll keep writing, because something inside of you will not give up.

There will be bad days. There will be days where you don’t even want to look in the general direction of your computer, knowing that if you sit down that…that thing will want you to type words again. There will be the bewildered looks of your loved ones, trying to figure out what happened to that person they used to know and who this sleep deprived interloper is. There will be nights where you absolutely can’t look at the line above your cursor, because you know that if you read that sentence you just wrote you’ll have no choice but to delete your entire novel and move to the deep woods in a vain attempt to hide from the shame of having written such dreck. But you’ll keep writing, because something inside of you will not give up.

There will be gray days. So many gray days. Days where it’s all you can do to keep putting one word after the other. Days where you know what your characters need to do, but for some reason they insist on metaphorically picking up the dry cleaning, washing the car, and paying some bills first. But you’ll move on. You’ll write your 1,667 words (a number that will become synonymous with both “freedom” and “prison” over the course of the month) and leap from your chair, desperate to do anything else. But the next day you’ll come back and keep writing, because something inside of you will not give up.

But there will be good days as well. There will be days where your brain is on fire, racing a million miles a second as you see your characters start to come to life and tell you what they’re supposed to do next. There will be the moments of pure, blinding brilliance, when you can see the end from the beginning and everything in between and it’s all beautiful and right and good and you can’t understand why you don’t already have a four-way bidding war going on for your book.

And then there will be the best day. The day where you paste your entire novel into the validation box and your word count bar turns from workaday blue to a sublime shade of…light purple. But who cares? It’s the most beautiful light purple you’ve ever seen, because it means that you are a winner. You did it. 50,000 words. You are a Winner. This isn’t like finishing a video game or putting together a jigsaw puzzle; in those you’re walking a trail someone else blazed. This is something new, something unique, and you created it.

From here the world is open to you. Despite what your output looks like, you have proven to yourself that you can do hard things. In addition, you’ve spent a month forging a habit of really zeroing in on something for an hour or two every day. Now you can re-work your novel, shape it into something you want to publish. Or you can start a different story, this time focusing on the brand new character that snuck into your story as an extra and kept trying to steal the show. You can create that new app for the iPhone. You can go back and get that graduate degree. You can do hard things, and you’re a better person for it.

And now that you’ve done it (or at least made it to the end of this bombastic article), please consider making a donation to keep NaNoWriMo running. Let’s make sure that other people get a chance to feel what you’re feeling.

Prism, Not Mirror

Prism, Not Mirror

My story, To: The Lady on the Train has gotten a lot of praise, for some reason. I’m still learning what people actually like in my writing, and sometimes things just catch.

But the criticism that has been leveled against it is that it’s not really fiction, because it’s so clearly based on something that really happened. This is somewhat confusing to me, because everything I’ve ever written is based on things that have really happened. Sometimes I put dragons or spaceships (or dragons on spaceships) in the mix because I like dragons and spaceships. But the core of every story is the world around me.

It’s been said that art holds a mirror up to life, but I disagree. If I had tried to directly reflect the experiences that seeded To: The Lady on the Train the piece would have been a lot longer and a lot less focused. It would have contained all the little pauses and moments where I had to say “I’m sorry, I couldn’t hear you, what was that?” Things like that are real but not good fiction. I took a forty-five minute conversation, edited out all the parts that didn’t fit the narrative I was trying to relate, simplified and clarified the things that made my point, and that’s what you got.

Instead of a mirror, I would say that art acts as a prism. Any work of art refracts out a part of the artists’s experiences. Life doesn’t fit on the canvas or the page. Ideas, feelings, themes; those are things you can distill out and communicate. If an artist of any stripe has done their job the authenticity of that idea, feeling, or theme will resonate with you and you will feel the truth of it.

Perhaps, if you take all the creative output of our entire species, every story, every song, every sculpture, every YouTube video, every podcast, every painting, every drawing, every poem, every hastily scribbled love letter; perhaps then you would get something approaching a “mirror”. But, like a reflection, it would still be a shallow, flat copy of an infinitely deep reality.