Relative Value

Relative Value

So, my work mouse is dying, which got me thinking about value calculations.

I’m willing to pay for an excellent product, if it does something I need. Or even if it does something I want. But those calculations get weird. Here’s what I mean:

This mouse:

Costs as much as this computer:

pcoverview

Which is odd of you think about it. One is an input mechanism, the other is an entire computer. How could they possibly be worth the same amount of money? And for that matter, why did I pay as much as both of those things put together for this pair of headphones:

The answer, I guess, is because that’s where my values are. I don’t much care about which mouse I use, so I’m not willing to pay all that much for a mouse. I like small computers, so I’m willing to pay for a weird small computer. I love good headphones, so I’m willing to pay  more for them.

First world non-problems, I realize. But here’s the thing. I have no idea about the relative expenses in making these three items. The headphones might be cheaper to manufacture than either the mouse or the PocketC.H.I.P. They’re certainly less difficult. Maybe Sennheiser is using really expensive materials and the price is justified. Maybe they just manufacture to very high standards (they are very wonderful headphones) and the price is justified by the care they took in their creation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *